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gengm125
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SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- Challenged for the first time under Major League Baseballs expanded replay system, umpires got it right. The umps went 3 for 3 on Monday as MLB tried out the new format at three spring training games. The first test came at 3:06 p.m. EST in Fort Myers, Fla., after first base umpire Fieldin Culbreth ruled Toronto shortstop Munenori Kawasakis throw pulled Jared Goedert off the bag in the sixth inning. "Im not too sure that youre not right here," Culbreth said Blue Jays manager John Gibbons told him, "but since we havent done it before, lets go take a look." Culbreth answered: "OK. Thats what its for." After 2 minutes, 34 seconds, replay umpire Brian ONora relayed his call by headset, confirming that Minnesota batter Chris Rahl was safe. During the wait, Rahl said he realized he perhaps was part of history. "Its kind of funny. I was thinking, Is this the first one?" he said. ONora made the final ruling from a satellite truck outside the stadium. During the regular season, umpires on the field will check with the replay booth in New York, where an MLB umpire will make the final call. Later in the game, Culbreth rotated and took a turn in the truck, confirming another safe call at first base. "Im looking at this thing as, this is the future of the game. And Im going to treat these games here the same way that Im going to treat them during the regular season," Culbreth said. In the eighth inning, Doug Bernier of the Twins was called safe on a close play at first. As Culbreth studied the replay, the ballpark sound system played a Rolling Stones song with the familiar lyric, "I cant get no satisfaction." The call was confirmed, Bernier was safe. Extra replay also was in place for two games in Arizona -- the Los Angeles Angels vs. Arizona Diamondbacks in Scottsdale and the Chicago Cubs against Milwaukee in Phoenix. Each team in the majors will have at least five exhibition games with the new system in place. In January, owners approved the use of additional video replay to review most calls other than balls-and-strikes. Previously, umpires could only go to replay to review home runs and boundary calls. Moments after the first replay call, Angels manager Mike Scioscia wasted little time in using his challenge. In the top of the second, Luis Jimenez of the Angels tried to steal second. Catcher Bobby Wilsons throw was high but second base umpire Bill Miller ruled that Aaron Hill tagged the runner out. Scioscia bounded out of the dugout and charged toward Miller to argue, just like managers always have done. Instead, though, he chose to use his challenge. After two of the umpires made a quick visit to the Angels dugout to communicate with the replay umpire, the call was upheld. "We werent trying to make a mockery out of it," Scioscia said of using the challenge so soon. "We thought it was a pretty close play." There was only one angle available with the limited camera work of a spring training telecast. "If we have 15 angles of that," Scioscia said, "theres a possibility it gets reversed." That review took 2:31. Since he lost the challenge, Scioscia had no more. "I dont think its going to take much time in the logistics. That will smooth out," he said. "As far as the strategy of it, thats going to take a lot. It might be something you win, but you know you need that challenge to save the big play somewhere." Twins manager Ron Gardenhire and Arizonas Kirk Gibson did not use their challenge. Neither did Cubs manager Rick Renteria nor the Brewers Ron Roenicke. Gibson said he thought about contesting a close play when Paul Goldschmidt nearly beat out a grounder but said he decided it was 50-50 and not worth it. "I think its going to be a lot more complicated than we thought," Gibson said. "We had a lot of conversation during the game." For the Angels-Diamondbacks game, the replay trailer was set up in the parking lot behind centre field. Teams are allowed to have a person to watch the game on television and advise the managers via phone whether it would be worth it for the call to be challenged. The Angels communicated via walkie talkie Monday but there will be a dedicated phone line for each team in the major league parks. Under the new rules, each manager has one challenge. If the first challenge is successful, the manager gets a second. From the seventh inning on, if the manager is out of challenges, the umpire can decide to have the play reviewed. Some critics of expanded replay worried that challenges would delay the game too much. Culbreth said he didnt think that would be a problem, and pointed at the benefits. "It will work itself out. I think time really isnt going to be an issue in the end," he said. "And if it is, its about getting the play right in the end, anyhow." Aviators Sunglasses For Sale. 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Jagr will make his first appearance in Pittsburgh since his return to the league following a three-year absence on Thursday when the Penguins host the Flyers. He understands there will be some animosity.OTTAWA -- With the Sochi Winter Olympics fast approaching, overseers of Canadas elite athletes are hoping to avoid a post-podium national embarrassment. In an effort to catch cheaters, the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport launched an anonymous snitch line Tuesday where athletes and others connected to sport can report allegations of doping. The announcement comes on the heels of last weeks revelations by Victoria cyclist Ryder Hesjedal, who admitted to doping more than a decade ago. Canadians want to be reassured that every effort is being made to prevent an embarrassing spectacle in Sochi, centre president and CEO Paul Melia told a news conference in Ottawa. Melia cited the bitter memory of the moment Jamaican-born sprinter Ben Johnson was stripped of his Olympic gold medal after being disqualified for doping at the 1988 Summer Games. "No one wants to see a Canadian athlete receive a medal on Friday only to see it taken away on Saturday," he said. "We lived that once. We dont want to live it again." To aid in the anti-doping effort, the federal government and the Canadian Olympic and Paralympic committees are contributing a combined $1 million toward the fight against illegal performance enhancements. The money will help boost testing of athletes in the four months prior to the Sochi Olympics, say organizers. It will also strengthen the investigative capacity oof Canadas anti-doping program, said Bal Gosal, Canadas minister of state for sport.dddddddddddd The announcement also comes in advance of an international anti-doping conference being held next week in South Africa, where a new code of standards is expected to be adopted by sports organizations and government around the world. A "Report Doping Hotline" (1-800-710-CCES) has been set up to encourage anyone with knowledge of doping in amateur sport to come forward. Its just one more step toward more fairness in sports, says Canadian Olympic Committee president Marcel Aubut, who acknowledged Tuesday that his committee has done little until now to address the problem. "Fairness, clean play and integrity need to become prerequisites in international Competition," he said. "Competing against the worlds best in an equitable manner is what sport is all about." Its the first time the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport and the Canadian Olympic Committee have formally collaborated to tackle an issue. Aubut said only became concerned about high-profile doping cases when he saw media coverage about it while waiting for a plane back home after travelling to Sochi in advance of the Games. Thats when he came to the realization that Canada is vulnerable to a doping scandal of its own, said Aubut. "I read about this, and it shocked me," he said. ' ' '

April 23, 2014 at 3:30 AM Flag Quote & Reply

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